The End and Epic Return of EGM (Electronic Gaming Monthly)

6 January 2009

Electronic Gaming Monthly should be celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, but instead the Ziff Davis-owned publication is shutting down just shy of the milestone. A source within Ziff Davis has confirmed for GameSpot that the January 2009 edition of the magazine (issue no. 236) will be the...

Electronic Gaming Monthly should be celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, but instead the Ziff Davis-owned publication is shutting down just shy of the milestone. A source within Ziff Davis has confirmed for GameSpot that the January 2009 edition of the magazine (issue no. 236) will be the final installment of EGM.

The closure comes as a result of a corporate deck shuffling at Ziff Davis. The publishing company announced today the sale of its 1UP network of sites to the Hearst Corporation's UGO Entertainment. 1UP staff overlapped heavily with that of EGM, which was not part of the sale.

UGO touted the acquisition of "tenured editorial personalities" in a 1UP story announcing the deal. Despite that, it appears that many of the site's editorial personalities will not be making the trip to UGO. A second source within Ziff Davis said that roughly 40 people have been laid off, with a total of about two dozen remaining on staff.

Launched in March of 1989, EGM was originally published by Sendai and covered the Sega Master System, Nintendo Entertainment System, and even had reviewers dedicated to Amiga, Atari, and Commodore platforms. When it debuted, the Mega Drive and PC Engine were overseas products of the future, and not the Genesis and TurboGrafx-16 as they came to be known as stateside.

EGM is merely the latest in a succession of Ziff Davis gaming-enthusiast magazines to cease publication in recent years. Last year, the company terminated Games for Windows Magazine, a publication with a 27-year history, most of which was spent under the name Computer Gaming World. In late 2006, Ziff Davis also canned its Official US PlayStation Magazine after a nearly decade-long run marked by its PlayStation and PlayStation 2 demo discs. Two more Ziff publications, the Xbox-focused XBN and Electronics Boutique in-store mag GMR, ended their runs late in 2004.

29 May 2009

EGM is dead. Long live EGM! The struggling game magazine that shut down in January after nearly twenty years in print is returning later this year, courtesy of Electronic Gaming Monthly founder Steve Harris.

According to an announcement, Harris has acquired publishing rights and trademarks to EGM, with plans to restart the print publication in the second half of this year.

Harris calls the relaunch of Electronic Gaming Monthly a "welcome opportunity to continue delivering quality content to gaming enthusiasts," saying the new EGM team has "exciting plans for the evolution of what will once again be a leading independent voice for the gaming community."

The mag has the enthusiastic, but not necessarily financial backing of Ziff Davis.

"We are pleased that EGM is now in the hands of its original creator, Steve Harris, and wish him and the publication the best of success in the future," says Ziff CEO Jason Young.

The press release states that we'll hear more about the new EGM at next week's E3 expo. For now, a placeholder site featuring the announcement, with links to the resuscitated mag's Twitter and Facebook accounts resides at EGMnow.com.

28 June 2010

Post image for Electronic Gaming Monthly Is Back

Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), one of the most reputable and most popular magazines in the games industry, published its first issue since the magazine went under about a year ago. The verdict is – EGM is back and better than ever.

For me the appeal of EGM has always been its editorials and exclusive opinion columns, especially after the Internet became my main go to source for video game news. Writer personalities and opinions truly came through in their stories and gave the magazine a certain something other gaming publications seemed to be missing.

The new EGM is just how it should be. It retains the look and feel of the original but adds a fresh coat of paint and some interesting new ideas. I don’t remember all the writers from the original EGM but I don’t see a lot of return staff writers, here’s hoping more will join the team as this new EGM picks up steam. There are few Bitmob contributers still around though, Greg Ford, Jason Wilson, Demian Linn, Brett Bates and Aaron Thomas. Sean Baby also makes a triumphant and hilarious return. One notable returning writer is the notorious Dan “Shoe” Hsu, I’ll definitely be looking forward to his pieces even though he’s not Editor-In-Chief this time around, he’s on the review crew.

The first issue, Summer 2010, features an exclusive story on Moral Kombat and a cover that resembles a style we might have seen 10 years ago. Something I found interesting was the paper the magazine is printed on, it feels a little thicker than your average magazine, not particularly important but definitely different. There are also some really interesting opinion pieces from the EGM’s staff as well a number of original featured stories on different issues not usually covered in the gaming industry like, unionizing game developers, a new spin on 3D gaming and the concept of Greifing in online gaming. Classic sections like Insert Coin and Press Start also make a return.

There is also a weekly online version of the magazine that accompanies the monthly print publication called EGMi. It’s a cool idea that links both print and online into one medium. It will be interesting to see if the concept takes off. It’s also pretty reasonably priced, $24.99 for 12 print issues and 52 online issues.

The ultimate gaming magazine is back in a big way, go check out the “Komback” issue today.


Source: http://www.gamejudgment.com/somewhat-off-topic-electronic-gaming-monthly-is-back, http://www.gamespot.com/news/6202775.html